Champs Elysees - Palais Bourbon

Giardini began to work on this in 1722, Lassurance continued the work, Aubert and Gabriel completed it in 1728. It was originally built for Louis XIV's daughter, the Duchess of Bourbon, who gave her name to the palace. In 1764, it became the property of the Prince of Conde and he developed the building as it is seen today. From 1803 to 1807, Napoleon commissioned Poyet to build the facade, to complement that of the Madeleine which it faces, in the distance at the end of the rue Royale. The portico of the facade is enhanced by an allegorical pediment sculpted by Cortot in 1842. Other allegorised bas-reliefs on the wings are the work of Rude and Pradier. The interior is rich with works of art; it is worth noting that Delacroix decorated the library here from 1838 to 1845 with the History of Civilisation, while also in this room, Houdon sculpted busts of Diderot and Voltaire. Formerly assigned to the Council of the Five Hundred, and then to the House of Deputies, today it holds the National Assembly.